Book Review: Bugs & Bugsicles by Amy S. Hansen

Bugs & Bugsicles: Insects in the Winter
Amy S. Hansen

Every fall, bugs disappear. And every spring, they return. Where do they go? Bugs and Bugsicles answers the mystery.

Some die, leaving their young safe in an egg sack or crawling along the bottom of a pond. Others fly distant places. And one even freezes to thaw out and live another day.

Watch as crickets, ladybugs, dragonflies, and other insects get ready for the killing frosts. Then look again, as spring arrives, snow melts, flowers bloom, and suddenly, the bugs are back.

Bugs & Bugsicles: Insects in the Winter
Boyds Mills Press, Feb 2010
Illustrated by Robert C. Kray
Ages 4-12
32 pages
Non-fiction picture book
Hard cover list $17.95, paperback list $11.95

When I was young, bugs seemed magical. They’d be buzzing around all summer, and then as it got cold, they’d disappear. Where did they go? If you ever had that question, or have a grandkid who has that question, this book is for you.

Bio:
Amy S. Hansen writes science for kids. She went to Oberlin College where she studied English and Economics. Then she went to University of Michigan where she did masters in journalism and natural resources. Amy really likes knowing and writing about a lot of different things. She lives in Maryland with her husband, two sons and two cats. For more information, please see http://www.amyshansen.com

List of other kids’ books:
Amy’s books include: Powering Our World, a six book series (Rosen, 2010), Touch the Earth (NASA, 2009), Hubble: An Out of this World Telescope (A-Z Publications, 2009), Wild Animals (Publications International, 2007), How Things Work (Publications International, 2006), KidSource: Science Experiments. (Lowell House Juvenile, 2000).

For more information about Jim, please see www.jimwhiting.com. To inquire about availability of specific titles or to send a comment, write him at jimruns3@gmail.com.

To participate, send a blurb about the book, your bio, a cover image, author photo and list of other books to Jim. For the book itself, include the name, publisher and pub date, genre, number of pages, recommended ages and price. You can also provide links to a sample chapter, reviews and/or your website. Perhaps the most important element is the hook: Why would grandparents want to buy your book for their grandkids? To whom would the book especially appeal?

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