New Underwear Company Makes It OK To “Slip Up!”

underwear

Confitex, the world’s first, non-disposable, stylish incontinence underwear is set to be a game-changer for the one-in-three women that suffer from bladder leakage.

Until now, women had to make do with bulky disposable pads, but Confitex has launched a range of beautifully designed, washable and reusable incontinence lingerie, which look and feel just like regular underwear, allowing wearers to be confident about their daily lives.

underwear“Our underwear is beautiful, environmentally responsible and perfect for people who don’t want their condition to hold them back,” says Confitex co-founder and CEO Dr. Mark Davey, who first launched the brand in New Zealand. “Pads and disposable underwear are neither environmentally friendly nor overly comfortable – and buying them regularly is costly and can be embarrassing at the supermarket or drug store. Because Confitex look just like normal underwear, the embarrassment factor is removed and they can simply be put in the wash after each wear, making them a far more cost-effective and environmentally friendly option.”

Indeed, adults with light bladder leakage go through as many as four to six disposable pads a day. And disposable diapers—which can take up to 500 years to biodegrade—comprise as much as 15% of all landfill waste. Confitex not only keeps approximately 1,500 pads per person per annum out of landfills, it also offers significant cost savings to consumers, given that the annual cost of using pads for moderate incontinence sufferers can be nearly $2,000 a year versus the cost of purchasing several pairs of underpants.

“Confitex look just like normal underwear, the embarrassment factor is removed and they can simply be put in the wash after each wear, making them a far more cost-effective and environmentally friendly option.”

Confitex co-founder and CEO Dr. Mark Davey,

Pelvic floor weakness, leading to a loss of bladder control, is usually associated with having had a baby or simply getting older, but young women can also be at risk of developing incontinence by doing too many high-intensity interval training (HIIT) work-outs. A larger issue might be perceived stigma surrounding the issue. “People are ashamed,” says Dr. Lynsey Hayward, president of the International Urogynecological Association. “People hide. They stop going to social functions. They work around the problem. They stop exercising, playing football with the kids. . .  They make their lives smaller to keep the problem secret. A lot of women don’t tell their husbands.”

And bladder incontinence isn’t exclusive to women, either: men with prostate problems suffer from it too, with one in 10 having the condition. In response, Confitex has also designed men’s trunk briefs, which look and feel just like regular briefs.Confitex products are available in light and moderate absorbency line in a range of colors and styles.

Use coupon code GRAND at www.confitexunderwear.com for free shipping. 

 

 

 

 

 

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