Look Who Won the Dover Library of Books

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Meet the winner of the Dover Publications contest – Terri Mehl

My legal name is Catherine but I have always gone by my nickname, Terri.

I am the retired director of Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes, Sacramento.  Having spent many years helping children and adults with reading and comprehension challenges,  I am a strong advocate of helping everyone learn to love reading, whatever their challenges may be.  Now I get to share that with Ella and Henry!  Lucky me!

Congratulations to Terri Mehl for entering and winning the grand prize of a 20 book library for her grandkids from Dover Publications.

On behalf of Dover Publications and GRAND, we want to thank all the wonderful folks who took the time to enter this contest. By doing so, you demonstrated your commitment to early childhood literacy.

dover publicationsSince their founding in 1941, Dover Publications has built a reputation by offering remarkable products at amazing prices. Everyone in the Dover family wants you to be delighted with your purchase. When you shop at Dover, you may do so with complete confidence. They stand behind every product they sell with our unconditional guarantee.

Covering an incredible variety of hobbies and interests, affordable Dover books make wonderful gifts for any occasion. Plus, they offer a complete selection of gift certificates so your family and friends can handpick the books they love.

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Grandfather reading to grandchildren in library

Experts agree, learning to read early and reading often is the key to academic success for children. Here is another article about how you as a grandparent can help develop a love of reading in your grandchildren. 

According to , “Helping children overcome reading disabilities early on will show positive effects on their IQ as they grow up.

Most parents nurture a secret desire that their child will grow up to be an Einstein or a Rosalind Franklin. While the market is flooded with a number of commercial products like DVDs, books, games, etc., that claim to boost a child’s intelligence, new research shows improving a most basic skill in child years will lead to the development of higher IQ later on in life: reading.

reading“Since reading is an ability that can be improved, our findings have implications for reading instruction,” Stuart J. Ritchie, lead author of the study, said in a press release. “Early remediation of reading problems might aid not only the growth of literacy but also more general cognitive abilities that are of critical importance across the lifespan.” Ritchie and his colleagues from the University of Edinburgh and King’s College London conducted this research, published in the journal Child Development.” 

To read the complete article click here. 

 

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