How To Talk To Your Child About The Pro-Trump Mob At The Capitol


How To Talk To Your G-Kids About The Pro-Trump Mob At The Capitol

The following is from Maggie Gordon of The Houston Chronicle:

An angry mob stormed the Capitol building on Wednesday, forcing the evacuation of both the House and Senate, as they met to certify the results of November’s election.

As the unprecedented moment unfolded, the nation’s television stations all tuned in to the mass chaos and violence. And millions of Americans working and learning at home during the pandemic pivoted their attention to the scene. Children included.

Parents and grandparents “should strive to protect their children from viewing the chaos,” the Baylor College of Medicine recommended in a news release sent out Wednesday afternoon, as elected officials took to Twitter to condemn the mob’s actions.

Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, at the Capitol in Washington. As Congress prepares to affirm President-elect Joe Biden's victory, thousands of people have gathered to show their support for President Donald Trump and his claims of election fraud.
Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, at the Capitol in Washington. As Congress prepares to affirm President-elect Joe Biden’s victory, thousands of people have gathered to show their support for President Donald Trump and his claims of election fraud.

Dr. Laurel Williams, associate professor in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine, offered up specific tips:

• Limit social media

• Limit news coverage
• Watch news together (if a child is interested or worried). Ask what they heard and learned, or what they are concerned about. Then, help provide them with facts to address their questions.
• Do activities that reflect your values as a family to help counteract feelings of helplessness
• Keep to your routine
• Be kind and pass the kindness along

Maggie Gordon
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Maggie Gordon is the assistant features editor at the Houston Chronicle, where she has worked since 2015.

The following is from NBCBoston.com

A Boston Children’s Hospital psychologist suggests parents (and grandparents) watch or read all news first before deciding what is age-appropriate for their children to view

The chaos Wednesday at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., was difficult for many to process, but it may be even harder for children to understand what happened.

“For little ones, saying something like, ‘people were really angry about what happened with the election, and then they showed it by starting a fight, and that was wrong, and the police are working to make sure everyone is safe.”

“For kids of all ages, it’s really important to reassure them that they’re safe,” Boston Children’s Hospital psychologist Dr. Erica Lee said on Thursday.

Lee said for very young children, it’s important to be clear without sharing too many details.

“For little ones, saying something like, ‘people were really angry about what happened with the election, and then they showed it by starting a fight, and that was wrong, and the police are working to make sure everyone is safe,'” Lee said.

The doctor said older children may have more questions, and it’s important to work through how they’re feeling and to make sure they’re not being misinformed.

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