Enjoy GRAND Magazine

for grandparents & those who love them

old

Old Isn’t What It Used To Be


Old isn’t what it used to be

BY ELYSE PELLMAN 

You have, undoubtedly, seen the signs of a new age of aging, from television and movies to music, athletics, finances, and more. Jane Fonda, at 85, has four new films out this year, including the comedy Book Club: The Next Chapter. Bruce Springsteen, at 73, and Mick Jagger, at 80, are selling out concerts. This year’s National Senior Games had more than 11,500 athletes (age 50+) participate, and Warren Buffet continues to share his financial wisdom at 92. These exemplars have no plans to retire soon.

“Old isn’t what it used to be,”

Mick Jagger, rockin it at 80.
old Bruce springsteen
Bruce Springsteen, on World Tour at 73

More and more older adults are aware of their newfound longevity, with greater numbers living into their 90s and even 100s. With longer lives becoming the norm, many are re-imagining how they want to live their later years. To better understand the dramatic demographic shifts and ways old age is being entirely re-defined, AgeWave commissioned a Harris Poll survey of over 2,000 U.S. adults, The New Age of Aging.

“Contrary to what one might assume, happiness soars with age, and anxiety plummets.”

Surprisingly, the survey found that 79% of adults 50+ think today’s older adults are more active, and 55% say they are more open-minded and curious than the previous generation. We see signs of a changing vernacular as 68% of those surveyed find the word “longevity” more appealing than “aging.”

Whereas aspiring for the fountain of youth was once paramount, today, Americans are trading it for the fountain of usefulness. Eighty-three percent of U.S. adults today say it’s more important to feel useful than youthful in their retirement years. Modern elders are increasingly seeking a continued sense of purpose and meaning in their lives.

 “As you contemplate the legacy you want to pass on to your grandchildren and loved ones during your life and beyond, consider the words of the renowned psychologist Erik Erickson: “I am what survives me.”

Contrary to what one might assume, happiness soars with age, and anxiety plummets. The study found that 71% of Americans 65+ say that the best time of their lives is right now or in front of them

old Ken Dychtwald

.   Buy

Today’s older adults are re-inventing retirement and are eager to pursue new dreams, adventures, goals, and a continuation of work for some. “Aging has finally come of age,” says Ken Dychtwald, PhD, psychologist/gerontologist and founder/CEO of Age Wave. Understanding our evolving perceptions of aging is more urgent than ever, as people over 65 make up an increasingly large portion of the U.S. population each year, with a projected 53% growth by the year 2050, according to most recent census projections.

As you contemplate the legacy you want to pass on to your grandchildren and loved ones during your life and beyond, consider the words of the renowned psychologist Erik Erickson: “I am what survives me.” Unexpectedly, the study revealed that 65% of adults 50+ think that values and life lessons are the most important thing to pass on to their heirs and loved ones, contrasting with 22% who said financial assets and real estate are the most important. This prompts a poignant question: How do you want to be most fondly remembered?

 

Elyse Pellman

About the author

Elyse Pellman is President of Age Wave, the nation’s recognized authority on aging, longevity, and retirement. In that role, she has led operations, client management, and consumer and B2B strategy and development to help dozens of Fortune 500 companies meet the complex challenges and grand opportunities of the longevity revolution. Elyse’s favorite activities are spending time with her husband, Stuart, her grandchildren, staying active and healthy, and traveling to Paris as often as possible.

Only $ 6.95

A Special eBook for New and Expecting GRANDparents

My Grand Baby ebook cover